The Wilkinson County Museum

On the Courthouse Square

Woodville, Mississippi


Wilkinson County Museum


In addition to maintaining a permanent display of documents and artifacts from Wilkinson County's history, the Museum offers for sale many resources for the genealogical researcher.

 A partial list of these documents is given here. For complete information and price lists, you are invited to write or call the Museum office:

Wilkinson County Museum
Post Office Box 1055
Woodville, Mississippi 39669
Phone (601)888-3998
OR
E-Mail David Smith, Director of the Museum.


BOOKS

The Journal of Wilkinson County History,
Volume III: The Woodville Historic District - photos, indexed.
Mrs. Stella Pitts, November 1992

The Journal of Wilkinson County History
Volume II: Marriage Records from 1800 to 1924
Compiled by Mrs. Linda Gene Carter, November 1991

The Journal of Wilkinson County History

Volume I: Cemetery Records
Edited by Mrs. James V. Gross and Miss Marion Miles, March 1990

The Woodville Republican
Abstracted from the archives of the oldest newspaper in Mississippi, published continuously since 1824. Each of these volumes is arranged chronologically and indexed by surname.
Compiled by O'Levia Neil Wilson Wiese

Volume V 1881-1883

Volume IV 1878-1880

Volume III 1848-1855

Volume II 1840-1847

Volume I 1823-1839

List of Officers and Privates CSA 1861-18656
Compiled by W. C. Miller, Woodville, 1903

In One Lifetime by Verna Arvey
The life and times of William Grant Still, America's first major African-American composer, born in Woodville in 1896. The University of Arkansas Press.

Jewish Life in Wilkinson County, 1820-1920, "Views of a Vanished Community"
Edited by Marsha Oates, 1996.

Jews in Early Mississippi
By Leo and Evelyn Turitz
Accounts of Jewish settlement across Mississippi. University Press of Mississippi, 1995.

Lost Mansions in Mississippi
By Mary Carol Miller
Eighty-five black and white illustrations of 57 ante-bellum homes no longer in existence, including La Grange, Bowling Green and the Grove in Wilkinson County.

Coming of Age in Mississippi
The classic autobiography of growing up poor and black in rural Mississippi.
By Centreville native Anne Moody, 1968.

Fiction

So Red the Rose
By Stark Young.
Southern Classic Series of 1934 bestseller and 1935 Hollywood film starring Randolph Scott and Margaret Sullavan.
Story of the Wilkinson County McGehees.

Sunset at Rosalie
By Ann McLaughlin
Fictionalized tale of life and the boll weevil on a McGehee plantation in Wilkinson County circa 1910.
 

Miscellaneous

The Great River Road Guide and Map.
Points of interest along the way.

Persac Map
Plantations along the Mississippi River circa 1858, measures 31" x 53".
 

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Wilkinson County Museum Building

About the Museum Building

The museum opening in October, 1991, marked the twentieth year of preservation efforts by the Woodville Civic Club, owner of the historic property.

 The building which houses the museum was erected in 1838 as the office of the West Feliciana Railroad Company and is located on the southeast corner of the Courthouse Square in the Woodville Historic District.

 The West Feleciana Railroad was the third oldest railroad in America and was constructed by Judge Edward McGehee and other Woodville financiers. Built to transport cotton from the county seat of Woodville to the river boats on the Mississippi at Bayou Sara, Louisiana, it was the first railroad to use standard gauge track and the first to adopt the use of the cattle guard. This railroad, which made its first run in 1842, was the first to issue and print freight tariff bills, and its home office in Woodville is thought to the the oldest of its kind in the nation.
 
 

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The Mississippi GenWeb project acknowledges and appreciates the contributions of the Wilkinson County Museum, the Wilkinson County Historical Society, and the Woodville Civic Club to this project.


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This Page is Copyright 1999 Ellen Pack, 2001-2009 Carolyn Switzer - All Rights Reserved