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BIOGRAPHIES COMPANY G, 2ND MISSISSIPPI INFANTRY
PONTOTOC COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

Surnames: A   B   C   D   E

  •    Adkins, Charles P.    Charles P. Adkins was a 30-year old tailor who apparently joined the Company on March 2, 1861 when it mustered into state service.  He was present at the Battle of First Manassas, but died shortly thereafter of typhoid fever at Charlottesville, Virginia, probably on August 12, 1861.  The Archives and the Nealy Muster list a J. B. Adkins as a member of the Company, but this is believed to be the same person as Charles P. Adkins.

  •     Aingell, Elijah L.   Elijah L. Aingell was born, according to the Miller Muster, February 12, 1828 in Logan County, Kentucky.  He was a tailor in Pontotoc. The Miller Muster describes him as 33-years old, 5 ft. 7" tall, fair complection, blue eyes and light hair. It also lists his mother as Poebe Jones of Adairsville, Kentucky. He was discharged for disability on January 3, 1862 at Camp Fisher, Virginia.

  •     Alexander, James W. James Alexander was listed by the Archives as 22 years old and a carpenter at enlistment May 1, 1861. According to the 1860 Pontotoc County Census, he was 22 years old and serving as a cabinetmaker with Isaac Carr, father of Oliver Carr.  He was severely wounded in the hip in the Battle of First Manassas on July 21, 1861.  After being treated at a hospital in Charlottesville, he was discharged due to disability on August 21, 1861.

  •     Barksdale, James M.   James M. Barksdale was shown as a 45-year old farmer at his enlistment May 1, 1861. In the 1860 census, he is listed (FN 135) as 47 years old and having $2,400 of real property and $7,000 of personal property, including 7 slaves.  Joining Company G as a private, he was appointed Corporal on August 1, 1861, then 5th Sergeant on January 1, 1862. He was present at the Battle of First Manassas on July 21, 1861 and at Seven Pines on May 31 when he was wounded. He was discharged on August 2, 1862 due to being over age.  His son, Rowdy Barksdale, was also in Company G.  See database "anthony" at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/for probable genealogy and descendants.

  •     Barksdale, Rowdy M.  Rowdy Barksdale, the 17-year-old son of James M. Barksdale, joined Company G with his father. He was killed at the Battle of Seven Pines on May 31, 1861.

  •    Barr, William  William Barr, a 39-year old farmer born in South Carolina, enlisted in Company G on March 1, 1861.  He was listed (FN 437) as owning 17 slaves in the  1860 census . William Barr was Capt. Hugh R. Miller's first cousin, the son of his mother's sister Rebecca Reid and the Rev. William H. Barr.  Although suffering from illness, he participated in the initial action at the Battle of First Manassas, but later was forced to retire from the battle. He was discharged for disability on November 6, 1861.

  •     Benson, Joseph P. Joseph Benson was an 18-year old student at the time of his enlistment May 1, 1861. He was listed as living with his uncle, the wealthy Pontotoc land trader William H. Duke, in the 1850 census, but was not listed in the 1860 census, probably because he was at school. He is described in the Miller Muster as "born Yalobusha Co., Mississippi, 18 yrs. old, 5 ft. 11 in. high, fair complexion, blue eyes, dark hair." According to the information in the Archives, he was discharged for disability on December 31, 1861. However, a letter from Susan Miller to Hugh R. Miller dated September 22, 1862 indicated he was still serving in the Confederate Army.

  •     Box, A. H.   A. H. Box was an 18-year-old Pontotoc County farmer who joined Company G in March 1862. He deserted in September 1862 prior to the Sharpsburg battle.
     

  •     Boyce, David   David Boyce was an approximately 27-year old tanner and coppersmith (the Miller Muster lists his age as 28, the Archives as 27) originally born in Portsmouth, Virginia. The Miller Muster describes him as five feet, nine inches tall, hazel eyes and red hair. He was wounded at the Battle of First Manassas and was discharged for disability on February 25, 1862.

  •     Buchanan, Joseph Initially appointed Fourth Corporal, Joseph Buchanan's occupation was listed as "clerk" in the Miller Muster. He was 22 years old at the time of his enlistment in April 1861. The Miller Muster describes him as 6 feet, two inches tall, fair complexion, black eyes and dark hair. He became ill in Virginia and was discharged for disability on December 28, 1861 at Camp Fisher.

  •     Carr, Oliver C.  Oliver Carr was a 22-year old law who mustered into state service with the Minute Men on March 2, 1861and was appointed Third Corporal . His father, Isaac Carr, was a cabinet maker in Pontotoc who was listed as owning $2,200 of real property and $12,000 of personal property, including 7 slaves, in the 1860 census. Oliver was elected 3rd Lieutenant on October 29, 1861 to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Charles D. Fontaine. When the Company was reorganized with new elections on April 23, 1862, he failed to win re-election and was discharged. He assisted Hugh R. Miller in the organization of the 42nd Mississippi Regiment, and was named regimental adjutant by Miller.  After the Civil War, he married Clemintine (Jo) A. Miller, daughter of Hugh R. Miller's brother Erskine Miller. He became a lawyer, merchant and planter, served as president of the board of trustees of Chickasaw Female College and lived in Pontotoc his entire life. See database "p1base" at http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com for genealogy.

  •     Cary, Miles Miles Cary was a Pontotoc County farmer who joined Company G in Richmond, Virginia on July 15 1862 as a substitute for Ike Mooser. He gave his age as 46 at enlistment. He was listed in the 1860 census (FN 72) as 42 years old, married with five children. He was sick for the Second Manassas, South Mountain and Sharpsburg battles in 1862 and was listed as absent at the Gettysburg battles in 1863.  He was shown as a deserter after December 1863.

  •     Childers, Levi A.   A 23-year old Tippah County farmer, who originally enlisted in Company D of the Second Mississippi, Levi Childers transferred to Company G on February 1, 1863. He participated in the Gettysburg battles in 1863 and was wounded at the Wilderness on May 5, 1864.  After missing the Talley's Mill and Spotsylvania Courthouse battles because of his wounds, he returned to duty on May 17, 1864 and participated in the Bethesda Church, Weldon Railroad, Fort Archer and October 27 Hatcher's Run engagements. He was listed as on furlough at the February 5 Hatcher's Run battle. He apparently never returned from furlough, and was listed as AWOL after February 28, 1865.

  •     Childers, William  William Childers joined Company G on March 5, 1862 and was listed as 30 years old and having resided in Tippah County. He may have been related to Levi Childers, above, who was also from Tippah County. William was wounded at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863. He was furloughed for 40 days from August 12,1863 did not return to the Company. He was listed as a deserter in October 1863. He may have been captured while on furlough since he was listed as a prisoner of war reporting at Memphis and receiving a parole in May 1865.

  •     Clements, Andrew J.   Andrew and his brother Gabriel, who was also a member of the Minute Men, were the sons of Joseph Clements, a Pontotoc County farmer. Joseph Clements owned real estate valued at $1,000 and personal property valued at $940 at the 1860 census. Andrew Clements, whose age at enlistment was listed as 30 in the Archives, was severely wounded in the throat and jaw at the Battle of First Manassas on July 21, 1861 and later died of his wounds on August 15, 1861.

  •     Clements, Gabriel   Gabriel Clements, brother of Andrew, above, was listed as 27 years old when he enlisted May 1, 1861. He was promoted to corporal in late 1861, then to Fifth Sergeant on August 1, 1862. He participated in the Battles of First Manassas, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill. He was severely wounded at the Battle of Second Manassas, and died from his wounds December 31, 1862 at Howard's Grove, Virginia.

  •     Combs, James W .  Born October 4, 1839 in Alabama, according to the Miller Muster, James Combs was the son of William Combs, a Pontotoc County farmer (listed in the 1860 census as owning $2,000 of real property and $1,465 of personal property and as a neighbor to Joseph Clements above).  William Combs, who also served in Company G, was another son. James was slightly wounded in the Battle of First Manassas, where his conduct was described as follows by Lt. Charles D. Fontaine in his August 9, 1861 article in The Examiner: "While on the subject of anecdotes of the wounded, I will mention another, illustrating the courage of Jim Combs.  He was scalped by a ball, and knocked senseless for some time.  He revived and rose up, as I am told, amid a shower of balls, very coolly commenced loading his gun, and only  left his position of danger, when he had completed the job, to find his comrades."  James Combs was elected Second Lieutenant at the reorganization of the Company on April 21, 1861. He participated in the Battle of Seven Pines and Gaines Farm. He was wounded at the Battle of Second Manassas on august 29, 1862 and returned to duty on November 20, 1862. He was wounded on the third day of the Gettysburg battle on July 3, 1863, but returned to duty on August 2.  He was present at Bristoe Station, the Wilderness battles, Talley's Mill, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Bethesda Church, Weldon Railroad,  Fort Archer and the October 27, 1864 engagement at Hatcher's Run. He was listed as on a "furlough of indulgence" in the last Company muster in February 1865.

  •     Combs, William William Combs was the younger (he was 19 at enlistment May 1, 1861) brother of James Combs, above. He was present at the Battle of First Manassas, and was slightly wounded in the head at the Battle of Seven Pines on May 31, 1862.  He was severely wounded at the Battle of Sharpsburg in Maryland but recovered, and was granted a furlough, returning to duty in April 1863. He participated in both the first and third days of the Gettysburg battle, but was captured at the Falling Waters engagement on July 14, 1863.  He was imprisoned at Point Lookout, Maryland, and was exchanged in February, 1865.

  •      Cooper, Thomas J. Thomas Cooper was 18 when he enlisted in Company G in April 1861.  He participated in the Battle of First Manassas, where Capt. Miller reported he helped bear Lt. Palmer's body from the field. He was promoted to Corporal on March 1, 1862, and participated in the Battles of Seven Pines on May 31 and June 1. He was wounded at Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862, and was named to the Roll of Honor for his bravery at that battle. He recovered and participated in the Second Manassas, South Mountain and Sharpsburg battles in 1862.  Although ill on the first day of the Gettysburg battle, he was present for the charge on the third day. He was slightly wounded with a fractured rib at the May 5, 1864 Battle of the Wilderness and was granted a 60-day furlough on May 20, 1864 on account of his wounds.  He returned to duty September 27, 1864 and participated in the battles around Petersburg at Fort Archer and Hatcher's Run in October 1864 and February 1865. He was captured at Hatcher's Run on April 2, 1865 and taken to Fort Delaware, where he was released on oath of allegiance June 11, 1865.

  •     Crawford, Thomas Thomas Crawford was a 27-year old clerk when he enlisted into state service on March 2, 1861 . He was initially appointed First Sergeant, and was promoted to First Lieutenant after the death of Lt. Palmer at the Battle of First Manassas.  Upon the reorganization of the Company on April 23, 1862, Crawford was elected Captain.  He participated in the Battles of Seven Pines, Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill, but was ill during the Second Manassas, South Mountain and Sharpsburg battles in 1862. He was present at Gettysburg for the first day's battle, but was sick on the third day and at Falling Water. He was in command of the Company at Bristoe Station, Wilderness (when he was in command of the 2nd Mississippi Regiment), Talley's Mill and Spotsylvania Courthouse battles. He was wounded with a gunshot flesh wound on October 1, 1864 at the engagement at Fort Archer, and was furloughed to Okolona, Mississippi for 40 days.  He failed to return from furlough and was listed as AWOL on December 31, 1864.

  •     Daggett, Frederick H.  Fred Daggett was one of the two sons of Horace and Lydia Daggett of Pontotoc. Horace Daggett was a merchant, the owner of a single slave and the brother of Stephen Daggett. Stephen was Hugh R. Miller's brother in law and a wealthy Pontotoc County planter (who owned 48 slaves in 1860). Both Horace and Stephen were descendants of a prominent New England family�their grandfather, Napthali Daggett, was a president of Yale College. Horace Daggett's other son, Henry Daggett, was a clerk in Cincinnati, Ohio at the outbreak of the war and joined enlisted in the Sixth Ohio Regt., Vol., Co. A., Capt. Wescot. Henry died of typhoid fever in Mississippi in late 1862. Stephen Daggett wrote Col. Hugh R. Miller, then in command of the 42nd Mississippi Regiment, requesting him to use his influence to get Fred a furlough to see his parents, who were "extremely anxious to see him and I suppose more so since they have heard of his brother's death."  Fred Daggett participated in the Battles of First Manassas in 1861, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, South Mountain and Sharpsburg in 1862. He was promoted to Third Sergeant on December 1, 1862 and to Second Sergeant in the spring of 1863. In the first day of the Gettysburg battle, he was captured at the railroad cut and taken to Fort Delaware. He remained a prisoner of war there until June 11, 1865, when he was released. According to an article in XIX Confederate Veteran 438,  after returning home, Daggett moved to West Point, Mississippi and married Bettie Shearer April 29, 1869. He died June 20, 1911.

  •     Dandridge, Spottswood N.    Spottswood Dandridge was probably the grandson of Nathaniel W. Dandridge of Pontotoc, an uncle of Lt. Charles D. Fontaine. Nathaniel Dandridge was married to Martha Fontaine, the sister of Charles D. Fontaine's father, Patrick Henry Fontaine.  Nathaniel Dandridge was also the uncle of Charles D. Fontaine's wife, Sarah Ann Dandridge. Spottswood was named for Governor Alexander Spottswood of Virginia, his great-grandfather. In the 1860 Pontotoc County census, Spottswood is listed as living with the family (No. 117) of Nathaniel W. Dandridge Jr., who oned six slaves. Spottswood was 18 years old when he enlisted May1, 1861.  At the Battle of First Manassas, Spottswood was shot in the thigh. He was eventually discharged because of his wounds on November 15, 1861.

  •    Dickson [Dixon], A. M.   A. M. Dickson joined Company G on March 1, 1862 as a new recruit. His age was given as 18. He was taken ill and was absent from the 1862 battles because of sickness. He died of disease in Richmond in May 1862.

  •     Dickson, George A. George Dickson was a 46 year old farmer when he enlisted in Company G, according to the Archives. The Miller Muster lists his age as 30. He participated in the First Manassas and Seven Pines Battles, but was sick during the engagements at Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill. He was discharged on August 2, 1862 for being over age.

  •     Dickson [Dixon], Robert B. Robert B. Dickson  probably enlisted in March 1862 at age 20.  Although sick at the time of the Seven Pines battles in early May, 1862, Robert was listed as present at the Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill battles. However, he became ill again, and died of disease in Staunton, Virginia in December 1862.

  •     Dillard, James M.  James M. Dillard was born August 17, 1840, in South Carolina, according to the Miller Muster. He was a teacher when he enlisted in the Minute Men in late 1861. His older brother, John W. Dillard, was also a member of the Minute Men. James lived with his brother, Thomas Dillard in the Coonewah area of Pontotoc County at the time of the 1860 census, and Thomas was listed as owning real property valued at $26,320 and personal property valued at $40,000, including 32 slave. Thomas Dillard was in the mercantile business as a partner with James W. Drake (the father of Richard Drake below). James Dillard enlisted as a private, was promoted to 4th  Sergeant on January 1, 1863 and to 3rd  Sergeant about three months later. He was  wounded in the left leg on the first day at Gettysburg and was captured on the retreat on July 5, 1863.  He was  paroled at Hammond U.S. General Hospital, Point Lookout, Maryland to City Point, Virginia on April 30, 1864 for exchange and immediately admitted to the hospital at Richmond, Virginia. He received a 30 day furlough May 21, 1864 and did not return to Virginia, being listed AWOL after October 31, 1864. He was listed on a Federal roll of prisoners of war paroled in Columbus, Mississippi on May 17, 1865. He is buried in the Birmingham Cemetery in Lee County, north of Tupelo near Saltillo.

  •     Dillard, John T.   John T. Dillard was the 18 year old son of a farmer, Joel Dillard, who lived in the Rocky Ford district of Pontotoc County. He joined Company G as a new recruit in March 1862, and his name appeared as James T. Dillard.  He participated in the Seven Pines Battles, and was on hospital duty from September 1862 through June 1863.  He was one of the few members of the Company who was not killed, wounded or captured at Gettysburg, participating in both the first and third day battles and at Falling Water on the retreat back to Virginia. He participated in each subsequent battle in which the company was engaged, and was named to the Roll of Honor for his bravery at Talley's Mill and again at Bethesda Church. He is one of the two members of Company G who were paroled at Appomatox Court House on April 9, 1965.

  •     Dillard, John W.  John W. Dillard was a 23 year old merchant in Pontotoc who joined the Minute Men on March 2, 1861 and was elected 4th Sergeant. He and his brother, Thomas,  were partners with James W. Drake in the mercantile business.  As noted above, his brother James was also a member of the Minute Men. After Lieutenant Palmer was killed at the Battle of First Manassas, John Dillard was promoted by election on July 26, 1861 to Second Lieutenant.  When the Company was reorganized on April 23, 1862, he was elected First Lieutenant. He participated in the Seven Pines battles, Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill, but was sick during the Second Manassas, South Mountain and Sharpsburg battles.  He was wounded on the third day's battle at Gettysburg and was captured  at Green Castle, Pennsylvania on July 5, 1863. Nevertheless, he was promoted to Captain while a POW on July 8, 1863. He was imprisoned on Johnson Island, then paroled and forwarded for exchange to City Point, Virginia on February 24, 1865.

  •     Dodd, Daniel   Daniel Dodd was a 21 year old farmer from Pontotoc County when he enlisted as a private in April 1861. He participated in the Battles of First Manassas, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill. He was killed at the Battle of Second Manassas.

  •     Donaldson, Joel J.   Joel Donaldson was listed as 30 years old when he enlisted in the Minute Men in April 1861 as a private. In the 1860 census he was listed as the overseer of the slaves of William B. Walker and his age as 25.  After participating in the Battles of First Manassas, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill, Donaldson was promoted to Corporal on August 1, 1862.  He was wounded at the Battle of Second Manassas on August 29, 1862.  He recovered from his wounds and was promoted to Fourth Sergeant in January 1863.  He was wounded in both legs and captured at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. He was named to the Roll of Honor after this battle. After being treated at DeCamp General Hospital on David's Island in New York City Harbor, he was paroled for exchange at City Point, Virginia on August 28, 1863 and returned to duty on September 25, 1863.  He fought in 1864 at the Wilderness Battles, Talley's Mill, Spotsylvania Courthouse, and Bethesda Church. Although absent from sickness from the Weldon Railroad engagements of August 18 and 19, 1864, he participated in the Fort Archer and the October 27, 1864 Hatcher's Run battles, and the February 5, 1865 Hatcher's Run battle. He was captured at Hatcher's Run on April 2, 1865 and sent to Point Lookout, Maryland, where he was released on his oath of allegiance on June 11, 1865.

  •     Donaldson, John B .  John Donaldson enlisted as a private in Company G on September 16, 1861. A 26-year old farmer at the time of enlistment according to the Archives, he was living with his 60-year old mother Rachael Donaldson in the Tallibenela District of Pontotoc County at the time of the 1860 census (which listed his age as 24).  He was present at the Seven Pines battles, as well as Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill. He was wounded at the Battle of Second Manassas, but returned to duty on November 20, 1862. He was present for both days of the Gettysburg battles in 1863, as well as the subsequent Falling Waters and Bristoe Station engagements.  In 1864, he was present for the Wilderness battles on May 5 and 6, as well as the Talley's Mills, Spotsylvania Courthouse and Bethesda Church battles (June 3 and 5) thereafter.  He was also present at the Weldon Railroad engagements on August 18 and 19. He was promoted to corporal and was severely wounded at the Fort Archer engagement on October 1, 1864. He was retired by the medical examining board on February 1, 1865.

  •     Donaldson, William E.   William Donaldson was listed in the household of his brother, A. P. Donaldson, the sheriff of Pontotoc, in the 1860 census. William was 33 when he enlisted in early 1861 in Company G. He was sick at the time of the First Manassas Battle and was discharged for his asthma on September 8, 1861.

  •     Drake, Richard   Richard Drake's father, James W. Drake, was first clerk of the Circuit Court in Pontotoc County in 1836. He was also Receiver of Sales in the United States Land Office in Pontotoc for several years.  When the land office closed, he entered into a partnership with Thomas B. Dillard and W.D. Brown in a commission mercantile business, with offices in New Orleans, Mobile and Memphis.  A close friend of Hugh R. Miller, in 1861 James W. Drake was appointed by Jefferson Davis to the Confederate auditor's office in Richmond.  Richard was a 20-year old student when he enlisted in the Minute Men March 2, 1861. He was elected Third Sergeant. Richard was present at the Battles of First Manassas and  Seven Pines. He was appointed Orderly Sergeant on June 15, 1862 and was wounded at Gaines Mill on June 27, 1862. After a furlough, he returned to duty with the Second Regiment on September 28, 1862. When the Second Mississippi was detailed to General Law's Brigade, he was appointed Acting Chief of on October 29, 1862.  He remained on that Brigade's staff, and was promoted to 1st Lieutenant and  Chief of Ordinance in General Law's Brigade January 2, 1863.

  •     Duff, John S.   John Duff, a 24-year old farmer when he enlisted in April 1861, died in February 1862 of disease.

  •     Earle, Charles W. Charles Earle was the son of Benjamin Earle, a prominent land trader in Pontotoc County (in the 1860 census, Benjamin Earle is listed as having real property valued $16,500 and personal property valued $20,503, including 15 slaves).   Charlie's  step-brother, William H. Newsum, was also a member of Company G.  William's mother Selina Newsum, an Englishwoman, was a piano teacher, who came to Pontotoc, divorced her husband and married Benjamin Earle. Charlie's age at enlistment, according to the Archives, was 17. He was present at the Battles of First Manassas, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill, but was captured in hospital at Warrenton thereafter. He was subsequently paroled and exchanged and returned to duty with Company G on January 1, 1863.  He was captured at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, probably at the Railroad Cut, and sent with the other prisoners to  Fort Delaware. He was not released until he took the oath of allegiance on June 11, 1865.  After the war he moved to Dodd City, Texas.

  •     Earle, Esias L.   Esias Earle was a teacher in a common school in the Redlands area in 1860, but at his enlistment in April 1861 his occupation was listed as clerk and his age as 25.  He was present at the Battle of First Manassas, and thereafter was detailed to hospital duty. He was present at the first and third day of Gettysburg, Falling Water and Bristoe Station, and was promoted to corporal August 28, 1863. He fought at Wilderness, Talley's Mill and Spotsylvania Courthouse, and was wounded on June 2(3?), 1864 at Bethesda Church.  Although furloughed from hospital on June, 17, 1864 for 60-days because of his wounds, he did not return to active service and was paroled from a Confederate hospital at Meridian, Mississippi in May, 1865.

  •     Early, Levi  Levi Early was one of the recruits who joined Company G on March 1, 1862. He was a 35-year old farmer from Pontotoc County at the time. He was present for the Battle of Seven Pines on May 31 and June 1, 1862, but became ill thereafter.  He died of disease in camp at Richmond, Virginia on November 2, 1862.

  •     Easterwood, George   George Easterwood was a 24 year old farmer at the time of his enlistment as a private in April 1861.   He was present at the Battle of First Manassas. Thereafter, on February 14, 1862, he was appointed  first corporal.  He participated in all of the 1862 battles and engagements, including Seven Pines, Gaines Farm, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, South Mountain and Sharpsburg.  He participated in both the first and third day at Gettysburg, and was slightly wounded in the left side at Falling Waters on July 13, 1863, where he earned the Roll of Honor. He was in hospital in Richmond, and after a brief furlough, returned to duty on November 10, 1863.  He participated in the Wilderness Battles, the Talley's Mill battle and the battle at Spotsylvania Courthouse. He was wounded in the battle at Bethesda Church on June 2, 1864, and received a  Furlough from hospital on June 17,1864 for 40-days. He was promoted to 5th Sergeant on in July 1864. On October 24, 1864, he was detailed for detached duty in the division commissary.

  •     Echols, B. F.  B. F. Echols was another of the recruits who joined Company G on March 1, 1862. He was an 18 year old farmer from Pontotoc County.  After participating in the Battles of Seven Pines, he became sick, but had returned to action in the engagement at South Mountain. He was killed in action in the Battle of Sharpsburg, September 17, 1862.

  •     Eddington, Robert S.   The 31-year old son of William Eddington of the Tallibenela District (who was listed in the 1860 census as owning $1,500 of real property and $1,600 of personal property), Robert Eddington was present at the Battles of First Manassas and Seven Pines. Sickness kept him absent from the remaining battles in 1862. He participated in the Gettysburg campaign, and was wounded in the right lung in the first day's battle. He was sent to hospital at Richmond and did not return to duty on until January 15, 1864. He participated in the Wilderness, Talley's Mill, Spotsylvania Courthouse and Bethesda Church battles before Petersburg. He continued in action with the company in the Weldon Railroad, Fort Archer and Hatcher's Run engagements in the fall of 1864 and in the Hatcher's Run battle February 2, 1865.  He was captured at Hatcher's Run on April 2, 1865 during the Union Army breakthrough. He was taken to Point Lookout, Maryland, where he was released on giving the oath of allegiance on June 11, 1865.

  •    Edington, John M. A Pontotoc farmer who enlisted in 1862 at age 40, John Edington was detailed as a hospital nurse. He was serving in this capacity after the Battle of Gettysburg when he was captured on July 5, 1865, tending to the Confederate wounded. He was taken to the prisoner of war camp at Point Lookout, Maryland, where he died on September 28, 1863.
     

  •     Edwards, James W.  James Edwards was a 20-year old farmer at his enlistment in Company G in April 1861. He participated in the Battle of First Manassas, was sick at the Battle of Seven Pines but participated in the Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill battles. He was sick during the remainder of the 1862 battles. He took part in the Gettysburg campaign, and was wounded in the battle on the first day. After being treated in a hospital at Charlottesville, Virginia, he returned to duty on September 15, 1863. He was listed as AWOL after the February 6, 1864 muster and as a deserter after  the July-August, 1864 muster roll.

  •     Edwards. William A.    William Edwards was a farmer and the 22-year old son of Mary Edwards of the Tallibenela District.  He fought at First Manassas, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas and South Mountain. He was severely wounded at the Battle of Sharpsburg on September 17, 1862. After a period in hospital, he was furloughed to back Mississippi to recuperate. He returned to duty with Company G after Gettysburg on September 2, 1863 and was present at the Bristoe Station engagement.  He was wounded again at The Wilderness on May 5, 1864, when he was named to the Roll of Honor. He returned to duty and participated in the Battles at Bethesda Church,  Weldon Railroad, Fort Archer and Hatcher's Run in late 1864 and at Hatcher's Run again on February 2, 1865. However, shortly after this last battle, he deserted to the Union Army.

  •     Ellis, John R.   John Ellis was a 45-year unmarried farmer (see Pontotoc County census family 388) from the Redlands district. He enlisted in April 1861 and was present at the Battle of First Manassas. He was discharged for disability (he was probably over-age) on May 27, 1862, just before the Battle of Seven Pines.

  •     Ellzey, Berry Marshal  Berry Ellzey and his brother Elijah Ellzey, both members of Company G,  were the sons of James Ellzey a physician who lived on  Tobias Ridge along Chiwapa Creek, in the Palmetto District, in Pontotoc County. James Ellzey was listed as owning $6,400 of real property and $11,665 of personal property (including 9 slaves) in the1860 census.  James wrote to Hugh R. Miller on February 28,  1861:

  • My son Elisha H. Elzey will go to Pontotoc next Saturday to join your company,  Berry M. Ellzey now at school in Pontotoc will join immediately if you will tell him he has my permission, and I think Preston S. Ellzey now at school at Mr. Barlow's will join you--and finally, along side of the rest, when you meet the enemies of my country, let me have some humble place on board of a horse armed with a Double Barrell'd Gun, "And thou shall see what thy servant can do."  The reason I make the request is, that I have Asthma and can't walk like other men and I can't see how to shoot a rifle.  I have been sick a week but I am slowly recovering--will probably be able to go to Pontotoc on Saturday.

  •    Berry Ellzey was severely wounded in the hip at the Battle of First Manassas. According to Hugh R. Miller's account of the battle in The Examiner, "Ellzy � was wounded when none of his comrades were near him, and � was taken prisoner by the enemy, but afterwards abandoned by them from alarm, thereby affording him the means of escape."  Berry was discharged for disability due to his wound at Camp Fisher, Virginia on October 27, 1861 by order of General Johnston.  After the war, Berry Ellzey became the probate clerk for Pontotoc County James Ellzey's biography is included in Pontotoc County Mississippi History and Families (Rose Publishing, 1999) p. 203-204.

  •     Ellzey, Elijah Harrison    The younger brother of Berry M. Ellzey, above, Elijah Ellzey participated in the Battles of First Manassas, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm and Malvern Hill. He was killed at the Battle of Second Manassas. Susan Miller wrote to her husband Col. Hugh R. Miller, then commanding the 42nd Mississippi Regiment, on September 15, 1862: Such an event as two battles on the same spot in the same war I dont remember ever to have seen on record. Surely, surely, God will soon bring this unholy war to an end. I feel so so anxious to hear from poor John Moore Willy Barr & others friends whose fates are yet unknown. Isaac Steppacher has received a few lines from poor Tom Rye who was detailed to assist in taking care of the dead, giving the casualties  of the old company but no other. All the killed & wounded were of the old Company & nearly all the best soldiers in the company. Poor young Elzy��I am so sorry to hear he was killed. Have hoped so much that poor boy might be spared to return to the patriotic father who so nobly gave them to serve the year. And George Easterwood & Clements. Oh I pray they may all recover & that no more will be taken. According to the article in Pontotoc County Mississippi History and Families, Elisha was killed "while charging a battery near dark on Friday, August 28, 1862."

  •     Estell, Jackson V.   Jackson Estell was a 19 year old single farmer when he enlisted in April 1861. He participated in the Battle of First Manassas in 1861, but was listed as sick during the 1862 battles. He was discharged for a heart condition on June 13, 1863.

  •     Estell, Levi L.  Levi  Estell was recruited and joined the company on March 1, 1862 at age 18.  He may have been the younger brother of Jackson V. Estell. He died of disease in late June or early July 1862 in Richmond, Virginia.
     

Copyright 1999 - 2002 by B. F. Thompson . All rights reserved.


 


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