Cities/Towns


(Sources listed at bottom)
Alden's Station1, 3
(extinct)
 
Alphaba1, 4, 5 a post-hamlet in the southern part of DeSoto county, near the left bank of the Coldwater river, and about nine miles southeast of Hernando, the county seat. Population in 1900, twenty-three.
Alpika2, 5 a small post-hamlet in the northern part of DeSoto county, on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R.R., three miles south of the Tennessee state line, and about 18 miles from Hernando, the county seat. It has a money order postoffice. Population in 1900, 32. The town is growing and prosperous.
Barnesville1, 3  
Bass3  
Bright1, 2, 3, 4, 5 a post-hamlet of DeSoto County, 6 miles east of Hernando, the county seat. Population in 1900, 50.
Buena Vista Lakes1  
Caldwell5 a post-hamlet in the southern part of DeSoto county, near the right bank of the Coldwater river, and about 7 miles southwest of Hernando, the county seat.
Cedarview1, 2, 3, 4, 5 a post-hamlet in the eastern part of DeSoto county, about 12 miles northeast of Hernando, the county seat and nearest banking town. It has a money order postoffice.
Center Hill4  
Cockrum1, 2, 3, 4, 5 originally known as Cockrum's Cross Roads; a post-hamlet of DeSoto county, 12 miles east southeast of Hernando, the county seat and nearest railroad and banking town. It has two churches. Population in 1900, 93.
Cub Lake/Cublake1, 2, 3, 4, 5 a post-hamlet of DeSoto county, 10 miles west of Hernando, the county seat, and nearest banking town. Population in 1900, 21.
Dark Corner4  
Days1, 2, 5 a post-hamlet of DeSoto county, 10 miles northwest of Hernando, the county seat and nearest banking town. Population in 1900, 35.
De Soto Front2, 4  
Dean's Corner1, 3  
Dorion3
(extinct)
 
Elm Grove4  
Eudora1, 2, 3, 4, 5
(extinct)
originally known as Ellaville, changed to Dixie and later Eudora; an incorporated post-village of DeSoto county, 9 miles west of Hernando, the county seat. It has a money order postoffice, two churches and an academy. Population in 1900, 91; the population in 1906 was estimated at 150.
Fairhaven1  
Free's Corner3  
Georgia4  
Glover1, 2, 3, 5 a postoffice in the western part of DeSoto county, and a station on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., 14 miles northwest of Hernando, the county seat.
Handy Corner1, 3  
Hernando1, 2, 3, 4 originally known as Jefferson
Holly Hills1  
Horation4  
Horn Lake1, 2, 3, 4, 5 This is a station on the line of the Illinois Central R. R., below the Tennessee line, twelve miles south of Memphis. It is in the extreme northern part of DeSoto county, 3 miles distant from Horn Lake - a resort for lovers of sport from Memphis. It was in this neighborhood that the pioneer families of the Bynums, Lundys, and Turners, from Virginia, settled in the early days of DeSoto county. The census for 1900 gave the population of the village as 99.
Ingram's Mill1, 2, 3, 4, 5 extinct in 1881; a post-hamlet of DeSoto county, 14 miles east of Hernando, the county seat, and nearest railroad and bank town. Population in 1900, 67.
Jago5 a postoffice of DeSoto county, located on Horn Lake creek, 8 miles north of Hernando, the county seat and nearest banking town.
Jagoe1, 3 extinct black town
Jenivee3 extinct by 1914
Kelly2, 3, 5 later known as Mineral Springs; a post-hamlet in the northern part of DeSoto county, near the Tennessee line, on the Kansas City, Memphis & Birmingham R. R., about 14 miles from Hernando, the county seat. Population in 1900, 56.
Kileton4, 5 a postoffice of DeSoto county, 8 miles east of Hernando, the county seat. Population in 1900, 15.
Lake Cormorant1, 2, 3, 5 originally known as Blytheville; a post-hamlet in the western part of DeSoto county, situated at the junction of the main line of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., and its Riverside division, 15 miles northwest of Hernando, the county seat, and nearest banking town. Population in 1900, 52; the population in 1906, was estimated at 100.
Lake View1, 2, 3, 5 extinct; a post-hamlet of DeSoto county, situated on Horn Lake, and a station on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., 18 miles northwest of Hernando, the county seat.
Lewisburg1, 2, 4, 5 a post-hamlet in the east-central part of DeSoto county, 10 miles east of Hernando, the county seat and nearest railroad and banking town. It has three churches and a school. Population in 1900, 72.
Lodockery4  
Love1, 2, 3, 4 originally known as Love's Station
Love Station5 a small village in the southern part of DeSoto county, on the line of the Illinois Central R.R. It is situated about 5 miles south of the county seat, Hernando, and has a population of 131. In the early days of the county, Dr. W. R. Love was a prominent physician and planter of the locality. A money order postoffice is maintained here.
Lynchburg1, 3, 5 a postoffice in the northwestern part of DeSoto county, 14 miles northwest of Hernando, the county seat.
Marienette1, 3  
Maywood1  
Memphis1  
Miller1, 2, 3, 4, 5 a post-hamlet in the northeastern part of DeSoto county, on the Kansas City, Memphis & Birmingham R. R., 14 miles from Hernando, the county seat, and nearest banking, telegraph and express town. Population in 1900, 100; the population in 1906 was estimated at 150.
Mineral Wells1, 3 extinct, originally known as Kelly
Mooretown2, 5 a hamlet in the western part of DeSoto county, on Hurricane creek, an affluent of the Coldwater river, 7 miles west southwest of Hernando, the county seat and nearest railroad and banking town. It has a money order postoffice. Population in 1900, 30.
Mount Galed4  
Mussacunna5 a postoffice of DeSoto county
Nemway3 extinct
Nesbitt1, 2, 3, 4, 5 an incorporated post-town of about 200 people in DeSoto county, situated eighteen miles south of Memphis, on the Illinois Central railroad, and six miles north of Hernando, the county seat. By reason of its proximity to Memphis, the country about it is especially favorable for the introduction of Dairy farming and the growing of fruits and vegetables for the Memphis market. The soil, however, needs the application of fertilizers in order to render it highly productive. It has an academy, 2 churches and a sawmill.
Newport1  
Norfolk1, 2, 3, 4, 5 a postoffice in the northwestern part of DeSoto county located on the Mississippi river, 6 miles west of Walls Station, on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R. Population in 1900, 21.
Olive Branch1, 2, 5 an incorporated village in the northeastern part of DeSoto county, on the Kansas City, Memphis & Birmingham R. R., 18 miles southeast of Memphis. It has two churches, an academy, a steam mill, and several good stores. Population in 1900, 198; the population in 1906 was estimated at 300.
Overland Park4 new name for Center Hill
Overpark5 a hamlet in the extreme northeastern part of DeSoto county, about 18 miles from Hernando, the county seat. The postoffice at this place was discontinued in 1905, and it now has rural free delivery from Olive Branch, the nearest railroad station.
Owensville4  
Penton1, 2, 3, 5 a hamlet in the western part of DeSoto county, on the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley R. R., near the Mississippi river, 16 miles distant from Hernando, the county seat. It has a money order postoffice. Population in 1900, 65.
Pleasant Hill1, 2, 3, 4, 5 originally known as Robertson's Cross Roads; an incorporated post-town in the northern part of DeSoto county, on Camp creek, an affluent of Coldwater river, 24 miles southeast of Memphis. Miller, on the K. C. M. & B. R. R. is the nearest railroad station, and Hernando, on the I. C. R. R. is the nearest banking town. It has several stores, two churches and a Masonic Institute. Population in 1900, 230; the population in 1906 was estimated at 300.
Plum Point1, 2, 3, 4, 5 a post-hamlet in the northern part of DeSoto county, near the northern boundary line of the State, 12 miles distant from Hernando, the county seat. Population in 1900, 23.
Robinson Gin1  
Southaven1  
Sirene4  
Stonewall1, 3  
Trinity1  
Twin Lakes1  
Valley Grove4  
Walls1, 2, 3 originally known as Alpika
West Days1  
Wilco Estates1  
Wooten extinct by 19363; a postoffice of DeSoto county, 5 miles northeast of Hernando, the county seat, and nearest railroad and banking station11


SOURCES OF INFORMATION

  • (1) USGS GNIS
  • (2) 1895 US Atlas
  • (3) HOMETOWN MISSISSIPPI by James F. Brieger, 1980, 1997
  • (4) DESOTO TIMES Issue 24 Aug 1972
  • (5) Mississippi - Comprising Sketches of Counties, Towns, Events, Institutions, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form, planned and edited by Dunbar Rowland, LL.D., Vol. I.; Atlanta: Southern Historical Publishing Association, 1907.



1901 Population Statistics

The following population figures for 1901 were taken from "Cram's Superior Family Atlas - The World" Indexed - 1901. The population figures may have been taken in 1900. The "X" indicates the name to be a small place, crossroads, or station whose population was small or nonexistent. A few of these named places were post office addresses. The sum of the numbers is typically far less than the county totals indicating the spread out, rural nature of the county. This information was submitted by Milt Burford..

1901 DeSoto County - 24,751

1901 Names and Population of Towns and Places
DeSoto County, MS

Alphaba - X
Alpika - X
Blythe - X
Bright - X
Cedarview - 65
Cockrun - 48
Cublake - 8
Days - 8
DeSoto Front - 13
Eudora - 91
Glover - X
Hernando - 563
Horn Lake - 48
Ingrams Mill - X
Kelly - 18
Kileton - X
Lake Cormorant - X
Lakeview - X
Lewisburg - 15
Love Station - 131
Miller - X
Mooretown - X
Nesbitt - 192
Norfolk - X
Olive Branch - 198
Overpark - X
Penton - 138
Pleasanthill - 236
Plumpoint - X
Rose Bower - X
Sirene - X
Sullivan - X
Walls - 13
Wooten - X


This Page Was Last Updated Thursday, 04-Apr-2013 22:29:04 EDT

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DeSoto County Coordinator: Tim Harrison

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